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CBRN / HazMat Training Blog

Steven Pike

Steven Pike

Recent Posts

The vital role of medical physicists in radiological emergencies

Written by Steven Pike on 21 Jul 2020

In the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, prompt action by those working within the hospital environment can have a crucial role to play in protecting the health and safety of patients, staff and infrastructure.

Increasingly, there is the expectation that a hospital's medical physicist (MP) will be capable of stepping into a radiological emergency support role under the auspices of an Incident Command System (ICS).

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How to ensure optimum response to nuclear and radiological incidents

Written by Steven Pike on 01 Jul 2020

Whenever there is the need to respond to an incident that involves the release of an uncontrolled source of radiation, a critical objective will be to minimise the risk of unnecessary exposure.

Radiological incidents where there is the potential for a significant release of radionuclides are many and varied - whether it be a transportation accident, a fire within a nuclear fuel manufacturing plant, or a terrorist act that involves the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or improvised nuclear device (IND).

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How can a wide-area instrumented system boost radiation hazard training?

Written by Steven Pike on 23 Jun 2020

In the event of a known or suspected radiation accident or incident, the speed of response will be a critical factor in maximising the safety and wellbeing of people and the environment.

Understanding the nature and the significance of the radiation threat is key.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) International Nuclear and Radiological Event Severity Scale (INES) provides an invaluable reference for radiological personnel by prioritising radiological incidents or accidents according to seven levels of severity.

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The value of live demonstrations in countering emerging CBRN threats

Written by Steven Pike on 16 Jun 2020

Military organisations worldwide face the ongoing challenge of training against a multitude of emerging, complex and increasingly unpredictable chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) threats.

Effective and cohesive CBRN response relies on substantial planning and preparation that takes into account the wide variety of detection, response and recovery phases of an incident.

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What are the key innovations transforming CBRNe simulator training?

Written by Steven Pike on 09 Jun 2020

The use of simulators and simulations to deliver CBRNe training is recognised as being a highly effective way to immerse trainees in environments that are as close as possible to those that they will experience in real life.

Simulator training provides a safe way for CBRNe personnel to test their knowledge and skills in the context of real-world examples.

Crucially too, trainees are able to make mistakes, and to learn from those mistakes, without risk to their own personal health, the environment or infrastructure.

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The vital role of radiation safety training for HazMat professionals

Written by Steven Pike on 26 May 2020

Radiation safety training is a core requirement for all personnel who are responsible for the handling, transportation, transfer or receipt of packages that contain radioactive materials.

In the US, the federal government's Department of Transportation (DOT) is the lead agency responsible for the planning and support of land, air and sea-based movement of hazardous materials (HazMat) shipments.

Additionally, the department also sets out the training requirements for all employees who are responsible for working in a HazMat capacity.

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Training for the threat of nuclear and radioactive material incidents

Written by Steven Pike on 20 May 2020

Incidents that involve the unexpected presence, the deliberate dispersal or the illegal trafficking of radioactive materials are rare.

However, for those tasked with border security, law enforcement or first response, the effectiveness with which they can identify, manage and contain a radiological hazard is crucial.

Whether dealing with the consequences of transportation accidents, major spills, trafficking or suspected terrorist activity, the actions taken in the first crucial minutes following a radiological event are pivotal.

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A guide to the NATO International CBRN Training Curriculum

Written by Steven Pike on 12 May 2020

The individuals and teams that are involved in addressing the immediate and short-term effects of CBRNe emergencies span a diverse array of personnel - from police, paramedics and the fire brigade to hospital staff, crisis management teams and those tasked with detection, verification and warning.

The consequences of CBRNe incidents can stretch national capabilities to their very limits, often relying on transnational cooperation in order to achieve a successful outcome.

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How hands-on participation enhances radiation safety training

Written by Steven Pike on 05 May 2020

Hands-on training for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive (CBRNe) incidents has a hugely beneficial role to play in the development, application and practice of emergency response preparedness.

Participation in practically-based learning scenarios is especially advantageous due to the way in which it engages both sides of the brain - stimulating not only the processes of listening and analysing in the brain's left hemisphere, but also the visual and spatial processes in the brain's right hemisphere.

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What are the core principles of resilient CBRNe training?

Written by Steven Pike on 28 Apr 2020

Effective response to chemical, biological, tradiological, nuclear and explosive (CBRNe) threats relies on the implementation of robust policies and programmes and the provision of rigorous training that is both efficient in its delivery and long-lasting in its learning outcomes.

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